Nurse has Bubbly Praise for Soap Therapy

Dear Dr. Gott: I am responding to your request to report results from employing the soap therapy for nocturnal leg cramps. I’m a firm believer in this technique, and it has worked for me. Allow me to expand on my experience.

I am a retired nurse. I’ve been bothered by nocturnal leg cramps for as many years as I can remember. I’m 66 years old and in good health. Many years ago, probably in the 1970s or 1980s, my physician ordered quinine tablets for these cramps.

Nurse has Bubbly Praise for Soap Therapy

Dear Dr. Gott: I’m responding to your request to report results from employing the soap therapy for nocturnal leg cramps. I’m a firm believer in this technique, and it has worked for me. Allow me to expand on my experience.

I am a retired nurse. I’ve been bothered by nocturnal leg cramps for as many years as I can remember. I’m 66 years old and in good health.   Many years ago, probably in the 1970s or 1980s, my physician ordered quinine tablets for these cramps. They were very helpful in relieving my leg cramps. Then, sometime later, I was told that quinine was taken of the market due to its potential to cause heart problems. Once of the quinine, my leg cramps returned with a vengeance.

About 2 years ago, I learned from a friend that quinine was back on the market. I contacted my physician and was able to resume this medication. During that first year of taking quinine, I had virtually no leg cramps. After that first year, however, I began to experience occasional leg cramps that gradually increased in occurrence and intensity. I believed I was developing a tolerance to the drug. Before I could see my doctor about increasing my dosage, I saw your article about the soap therapy. I tried it. I put two small soap bars under the bed sheet near my legs.

Additionally, each night before retiring, I rubbed both legs with a dry bar. Miraculously, the leg cramps ceased. Once in a great while now, I may still get a mild cramp, but I seem o have narrowed it down to a reason: The cramp occurred each time I took the quinine at a much later hour than normal. I believe that the quinine and the soap therapy combined relieve my leg cramps.

When I finally saw my doctor, I told him about the soap therapy. My doctor said he was not familiar with this technique, but he thought it might be beneficial to some of his patients.

Allow me to cite another testimonial. While attending a committee meeting and sitting next to a retired physician, the subject came up about the doctor’s wife having nocturnal leg cramps. She tried the soap and it worked.

I want to thank you for writing about this soap therapy, as it has relieved a lot of suffering. I now tell my friends with the same affliction of this unusual treatment.

Dear Nurse: Your interesting experiences are not unique.
Many users of quinine (that I once recommended universally for nocturnal leg cramps) have written to tell me that 1. the medicine’s effectiveness diminishes over time, 2. the expense is significant, and 3. there is the heart problem.

Although I still have no explanation for how soap (placed under the bottom sheet at the foot of the bed) can prevent leg cramps at no risk and trivial cost, can now reassure my friends that hundreds of readers have written to me, confirming the beneficial consequences.
Thank you all. Please keep your mind open to other possible alternative therapies.

Doctor Peter Gott
re-printed with permission